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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
, john kerry bid good-bye to the united states senate today in an emotional lookback on his career. he talked about the importance of listening, not just to his fellow senators, but to the people they represent. . >> i came to the national mall, 1971 with fellow veterans who wanted to talk to our leaders about the war. president nixon tried to kick us off the mall. but we knocked on door after door of capitol hill and too often couldn't get an audience. a precious few, including ted kennedy and hubert humphery came to where we were camped out. i saw firsthand that our political process works only when leaders are willing to listen. >> he left the floor to a standing ovation capping off nearly three decades of public service. and it set off a mad political scramble to his senate seat. today, massachusetts governor picked boston lawyer as an interim replacement. >> so who is mr. callan? and is scott brown gearing up for a comeback? >> joining me now is susan mil ler ligan and contributor to the last lion, the biography of the late senator ted kennedy. thank you both for coming on the sho
the united states senate. and that's because despite the obvious frustrations of recent days and years, a frustration that we all share this place remains one of the most extraordinary institutions of any kind on the face of the earth. on occasion we all heard a senator leave here and take their leave condemning the senate for being broken, an impossible setting in which to try to do the people's business. well, i want to be very clear about my feelings. i do not believe the senate is broken. certainly not as an institution. there is nothing wrong with the senate that can't be fixed by what's right about the senate. the predominant and weighty notion that 100 american citizens chosen by their neighbors to serve from states is different as massachusetts and montana can always choose to put parochial or personal interests aside and find the national interest. i believe it is the honor of a lifetime, an extraordinary privilege to have represented the commonwealth of massachusetts and the united states senate for more than 28 years. what a remarkable gift it has been to carry the banner of
states senators who voted down sandy relief a couple days ago, you know that something has fundamentally changed about the way that republicans talk about government. so i think it's too early to say that they're dead, but all the things dana points to are good signs and signs of some kind of sanity seeping in. >> and dana, maybe it's all in a name. because i think what continues on for sure is this conservative domination particularly in republican primaries. i mean, here you've got mitch mcconnell being threatened now in kentucky and next year's election from the right. >> right. and the tea party's never really been an organized political force. and i'm using that as a shorthand for the far right that's been dominating the party right now. and as i point out in the column, that force really isn't going anywhere because of the redistricting, because of the way things are structured in the house. and because of this primary system. we also have saxby chambliss bowing out rather than face a primary challenge. the element of the party is going to be dominant for some time to come. is the
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)